the book thief without the words

christine. eighteen. university of pittsburgh.


lovelylethargy → memingers



From one white feminist to another: how to accept that you are, indeed, a White Feminist. 

wow-suchbree-veryblog:

So, you’ve been called out for exercising a non-inclusive brand of “white feminism!” Or maybe you’ve seen someone bitterly mocking a white feminist. Or maybe you don’t understand what “womanism” is or why it needs to be a thing. You, my friend, are a white feminist. And contrary to what your knee-jerk reaction may tell you, you’re not a bad person.

There are a few things, though, that you need to keep in mind as a white feminist.

What no one is saying:

* You are a bad person for being white.
* You can help being white.
* Problems that white women face are not real problems.

What they are saying/what you have to acknowledge:

* Though you do not have male privilege, you still benefit from white privilege. No matter what.
* Much of the oppressive acts unleashed on white women have an added layer of horrible when unleashed against a woman of colour. For example, cat calls against WoC often have racial connotations, many creeps on OKCupid virtually stalk Asian women saying horrifically sexist things that are specific to Asian women.
* White women have, historically, been given credit for things that WoC have had larger hands in, and have also had their voices heard more, and valued more.
* Statistics don’t lie: women of colour face higher rates of most atrocities such as vioence and homelessness. Women of colour also go missing at alarmingly high rates but are less likely to receive the same media attention as white women.

Okay, so now that you’re aware, can you ever stop benefitting from that privilege?
* Nope, it doesn’t work that way. I’m privileged, you’re privileged, we’re all a bunch of happy privileged ladies.

But that’s not fair.
* Is it though?

But we’re not all like -
* Stop.

Bree, aren’t you white?
* Yep. White, privileged, and fully acknowledging it.
* Now is probably a good tme to hypothesize that you’re probably paying more attention to this BECAUSE I’m white, and that if I were a WoC you would probably dismiss it as an “angry black woman.” Why do I think this? Well, I used to think that way. Frighteningly enough, not even that long ago.

Well boo-urns. I’m a white feminist. What can I do?
* More like, what should you not do?

Okay, give me your ideas.
* First and foremost, fucking acknowledge that you’re white and you benefit from that privilege.
* Secondly, know that nothing you do can renounce that privilege. Not how many women of colour you befriend, not how many posts like this you write or reblog.
* Don’t expect women of colour to educate you on how to be a better feminist.
* Don’t declare yourself a womanist. Just… Don’t.
* Don’t give problematic white women a free pass just because they’re a woman. Examples include Lady Gaga and Lena Dunham. Know that being oppressed in one way does not take away your power in other ways. This doesn’t mean you have to stop liking every privileged celebrity, just become more aware and more vocal about times when they fuck up and hurt people.
* Don’t speak for women of colour.
* Don’t claim to renounce your whiteness or, heaven forbid, that you are transethnic. Your whiteness is NOT going away.
* Don’t ask “why does it always have to be about race?”
* Don’t do the little trademark thing when you write “white feminist” referring to another white feminist. This implies that it’s only a certain kind of white woman who benefits from white privilege.

Okay, so these are things I’ve learned over the past year from people who have helped me understand just how much advantage I was born with, how much I still have, and how many more problems there are. Thank you to those who have helped me understand that oppression has dozens of intersections, and that we can all be better.

(via theatomfamily)


14 hours ago · 50 notes · originally from wow-suchbree-veryblog

lessthanthreepress:

INTERTWINED: A NEW COLLECTION CALL OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS


Intertwined — A Poly Collection — Love is not always a matter of twos. Sometimes love comes in threes, fours, even more. What some consider a crowd, others consider just right. From a contemporary tale that defy society expectation of a happy couple, to a fantasy world where three or more is the expectation, Less Than Three Press invites you to submit stories about people who find that love sometimes has room for more.
THE DETAILS:
Deadline is JANUARY 31, 2015 (give or take, we won’t kill you for sending it off the following morning).
Stories should be at least 10,000 words and should not exceed approx 50,000 words in length.
Stories may be any combination of poly (M/M/M, F/F/F, M/M/F, F/F/M/F, etc.). Cis, trans* and genderqueer characters are welcome.
Stories must have a happily ever after (HEA) or happy for now (HFN) end.
Any sub-genre is gladly accepted: sci-fi, mystery, contemporary, steampunk, etc.
All usual LT3 submission guidelines apply.
Intertwined is a collection, meaning stories will be sold individually and authors paid royalties. Examples: Proud to Be a Vampire or A Loose Screw.
Authors will receive one copy each of the ebook formats LT3 produces and 2 print volumes (stories 40k and over will be their own books, shorter stories will be compiled into anthologies).
Stories should be complete before submitting, and as edited as possible. They can be submitted in .doc, .docx, or .rtf format, single spaced with a space between paragraphs, in an easy to read font (we prefer Calibri size 12) with no special formatting (no elaborate section separation, special fonts, etc). Additional formatting guidelines can be found here.
Any questions should be directed to the Editor in Chief, Samantha M. Derr, at derrs@lessthanthreepress.com (or you can ping her on twitter @rykaine).

lessthanthreepress:

INTERTWINED: A NEW COLLECTION CALL OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS

Intertwined — A Poly Collection — Love is not always a matter of twos. Sometimes love comes in threes, fours, even more. What some consider a crowd, others consider just right. From a contemporary tale that defy society expectation of a happy couple, to a fantasy world where three or more is the expectation, Less Than Three Press invites you to submit stories about people who find that love sometimes has room for more.

THE DETAILS:

  • Deadline is JANUARY 31, 2015 (give or take, we won’t kill you for sending it off the following morning).
  • Stories should be at least 10,000 words and should not exceed approx 50,000 words in length.
  • Stories may be any combination of poly (M/M/M, F/F/F, M/M/F, F/F/M/F, etc.). Cis, trans* and genderqueer characters are welcome.
  • Stories must have a happily ever after (HEA) or happy for now (HFN) end.
  • Any sub-genre is gladly accepted: sci-fi, mystery, contemporary, steampunk, etc.
  • All usual LT3 submission guidelines apply.

Intertwined is a collection, meaning stories will be sold individually and authors paid royalties. Examples: Proud to Be a Vampire or A Loose Screw.

Authors will receive one copy each of the ebook formats LT3 produces and 2 print volumes (stories 40k and over will be their own books, shorter stories will be compiled into anthologies).

Stories should be complete before submitting, and as edited as possible. They can be submitted in .doc, .docx, or .rtf format, single spaced with a space between paragraphs, in an easy to read font (we prefer Calibri size 12) with no special formatting (no elaborate section separation, special fonts, etc). Additional formatting guidelines can be found here.

Any questions should be directed to the Editor in Chief, Samantha M. Derr, at derrs@lessthanthreepress.com (or you can ping her on twitter @rykaine).



topsidepress:

Is there a transgender text in this class? Zine about teaching trans fiction & poetry (free download)

Topside Press is at the National Women’s Studies Conference this week, and we’ve made a zine to share with the professors and scholars. It is called “Is there a transgender text in this class?” and it’s about why and how transgender fiction and poetry should be included in courses.

The  16-page, quarter-page zine is available for free on our website, and it’s totally OK to read it online, print it out, give it away, sell it—whatever you want. If you have feedback for future versions, please drop us a line at info@topsidepress.com (or reblog, tweet, etc)

To read the zine online, you can download the pages PDF, or click over to our site to see the JPG files.
To print copies for your campus, info shop, or conference, download the spreads PDF

Download Options:

(via girlsgetbusyzine)


19 hours ago · 127 notes · originally from girlsgetbusyzine
#zines #poetry #cool shit

consentsquadron:

printable copy of our lil’ consent zine 

consentsquadron:

printable copy of our lil’ consent zine 



Zayn “Sassy” Malik: A Masterpost 

zaynfrustrations:

image

Let’s begin

Read More

(via heckzayn)


1 day ago · 2,565 notes · originally from zaynfrustrations

(via heckzayn)


1 day ago · 258 notes · originally from anothergirlinthisfuckedupworld

St Vincent

(Source: dyelllle, via pvbertyblues)


1 day ago · 6,020 notes · originally from dyelllle

slayboybunny:

ya hes cute…….but is he conscientious of the social inequalities and corruption in hierarchies of power that plague this world

(via heckzayn)


1 day ago · 55,179 notes · originally from slayboybunny

Anonymous whispered, "Please tell me you disagree with Nicki Minaj new video and the stereotype she wants to sell to the world about us :( I'm too disappointed with every black woman feeling proud of that shit ;("

angrywocunited:

I don’t have time for your respectability politics. 

I don’t have time for people who police the bodies of black women. 

I don’t have time for people who police the sexuality of black women.

How the hell is Nicki Minaj responsible for the Jezebel stereotype?

A detrimental stereotype, created by white men, that was utilized to justify the rape of black women.  

A detrimental stereotype that robbed black women of their sexual autonomy and identity. 

Why are people so afraid of a black woman’s sexuality?

As a black woman, I support Nicki Minaj 3000%

I’m disappointed that you would send such a message. 

-G


1 day ago · 889 notes · originally from angrywocunited

(Source: zaynmalif, via aimmyarrowshigh)


1 day ago · 2,911 notes · originally from zaynmalif